Stout

Many people think of a dark pint of Guinness when they hear the term stout, but its definition is much wider than that. There are many different styles, to the extent that the variety is somewhat daunting. Stout is a dark beer, which is traditionally made using roasted malt or roasted barley, hops, water and yeast. The name stout came from these types of beers being the most common term for the strongest or stoutest porters, typically at 7% or 8%. When stout sits in a glass it is completely black with a thick, creamy, long lasting head. When pouring stout it should be left to settle in order to achieve the correct consistency. It is rich and dry in flavour, with strong roasted aromas, which are reminiscent of coffee and barley. The first known use of the world stout was in 1677 in a document called the Egerton Manuscript, which described it as a strong beer, not a dark beer. Stout appeals to beer drinkers that are after something richer, darker, stronger, and more complex.