Italian Rose Wines

Just like France, rosés are made throughout Italy. There are various styles and grape varities which vary depending on the region and local climate. The history of Italian rosé stems from the warm southern parts of the country, where they encountered difficulties in the early days of winemaking. In the struggles to make dark, rich, full-bodied reds without temperate controlled fermentation vessels, rosé was born. As the must macerated with the skins, the intense heat of the process killed the yeast, leaving andresidual sugar in the remaining wine. Italian wine makers soon realized that if they pressed the wines earlier in the process, fermentation would complete, albeit with a much lighter coloured wine. Today most Italian rosé is made by the short maceration method. There are several terms for Italian rosé, the most important of which is rosato. It is very pale in colour, whereas darker rosés are labeled as Chiaretto. North east Italy tends to produce delicate rosés, while they are more dry in the south.