Vermouth and Aperitifs

Vermouth is an aperitif wine that takes its name from its former primary ingredient, wormwood. The word vermouth derives from the German word for wormwood, Wermut. Vermouth used to be a relatively simple topic, at least in the States. The American market had sweet and dry styles and largely shunned both. In the past four years, though, that's changed, and now there is a wide range of options in vermouth and other aperitif wines. An aperitif wine is nothing more than a wine (naturally) served before a meal as an appetite stimulant. Aperitif wines are often bittersweet and herbal. Aperitif wines are also fortified, which means they're blended with additional alcohol, usually grape brandy. Finally, they'rearomatized, or flavored with botanicals, such as aromatic herbs, roots, and barks. Spices and other botanicals in vermouth include cardamom, chamomile, cinnamon, citrus peel, cloves, coriander, ginger, juniper, marjoram, saffron, and vanilla.