Blended whisky is a result of neutral grain spirits, flavorings and coloring. It is also a result of blending different types of whiskies. The blending is done by mixing both the higher-quality straight whiskies and the less expensive spirits with other ingredients. Examples of such kinds of whiskies include; the Canadian Mist, Seagram’s Seven, and Jameson Irish Whisky. There are also a variety of blended whiskies in the Johnnie Walker Black Label brand. Blended whisky should not be underestimated because they offer a guaranteed and more rounded taste and pleasure which does not change.

Top Tasting Tips for Blended Whisky

The following tasting tips will flex your ability to taste whisky and expose your palate to a variety of different characteristics that include taste and aroma of the whisky. If you are a beginner the best-blended whisky for you to taste consists of the Famous Grouse Highland Blended Scotch Whisky and the Johnnie Walker Gold Label Reserve Blended Scotch Whisky. The ultimate goal of tasting whisky is to enjoy it in a meaningful way and then learn about the blended whisky’s different flavour profiles. You will then have high control over how you taste your whisky in the long run.

1.Getting ready – Getting ready is by getting yourself a glass that is wider at the bottom than at the top. Such a type of glass helps you to swirl and sniff the whisky without covering its components. You should then hold the glass by the stem to avoid warming the drink at hand.

2.Check the colour – Hold your glass of blended whisky up to the light. Try to note how it appears and think of any object that you know that resembles the colour of the whisky. It may be yellow, gold, flaxen-blonde hair, or any other object that you can imagine. The colour of the whisky is an indication of its maturity.

3.Check out the legs in the blended whisky – Checking out the legs is done by tilting the glass at an angle and then rotating it briskly so that it can coat the glass walls with whisky. You should then hold the glass straight and then watch how the whisky forms ‘legs’ as it tries to settle down the glass sides. If the legs are slow, the blended whisky is old.

4.Smelling the whisky – This stage involves holding the glass and then swirling it so that it can release aromas. You should then pass the glass under your nose and then taking a deep breath as you pass it through. Try to imagine what the smell smells like and what it reminds you. Maybe a particular flower, perhaps timber, Christmas cake, dried grass, smoke, seaweed or some fragrance. Put in mind the smell that you have just felt and then take a mental note.

5.Tasting the whisky – This is the final stage, and it involves taking a sip of the blended whisky from your glass. You should then allow the whisky to settle on your tongue and then try to identify the changing flavour within you. Try to feel the whisky by paying attention to it. Get to know whether it is refreshing or lively or dry. Feel whether it is sweet or bitter. Let your palate inform you about the structure of the whisky. Try to imagine what the flavour reminds you, ranging from either an orange, chocolate, bonfires or anything else. Is the feeling satisfying? Keep in mind whatever the whisky reminds you about and in such a situation, you will be able to remember the blended whisky the next time you get to taste it.

If you want to enhance the aroma and flavour of the blended whisky, you should add a small percentage of water probably 20% when comparing it to the contents of the whisky. The resulting water will automatically open the whisky thus revealing the workings of the flavour. Then mix the whisky and the water, and this makes the resulting mixture more drinkable. The aroma and flavour will become more evident when you do the tasting.

Sampling some unique blended whisky and being able to discuss and engage with your fellow minded whisky taking professionals is the ultimate and final goal of tasting whisky. It creates a beautiful formal event and or a fun, casual party amongst your closest friends.